Steam

Valve sets sights on Discord with updates to Steam Chat

Posted by | discord, e3 2018, Gaming, Steam, TC, Valve | No Comments

Discord has risen among the ranks of gamers as the most common choice for game-related communications. And it’s easy to see why: it works well and the competition is pretty dismal. But Valve is looking to keep users in-house with an overhaul of the chat options on its game platform Steam .

It’s a welcome change, one of many that Steam’s users have surely been asking for — the platform, while convenient in many ways, is also incredibly outdated in others. The friend and communications options may as well be ICQ, and let’s not get started on the browser.

Today’s news suggests that Valve has not failed to hear gamers’ cries. The revamped chat is very Discord-like, with text and voice channels listed separately, in-game details like map and game type listed next to friends and a useful quick list for your go-to gaming partners. There’s also a robust web client.

Voice and text chat is all encrypted and passed through Steam’s servers, which prevents the NSA competition from monitoring your squad’s tactics during PUBG games and griefers from tracing your IP and ordering a hundred pizzas to your door (or worse).

It’s long past due for a platform like Steam, but more importantly it lets them keep Discord in check. The latter, after all, could conceivably grow itself a game store or promotions page in order to subsidize its free services — and that would be stepping on Valve’s turf. Unforgivable.

That said, it’s far too late for Steam to steal away Discord’s users — it’s been adopted by far too many communities and the benefits of switching aren’t really substantial. But for people who have not yet installed Discord, the presence of a robust chat and voice client within Steam is a powerful deterrent.

It’s currently in beta, but you can request access here (web) and here (Steam). No word on whether they are developing a whole system of chat icons based on those wiggly little egg-people in the top image. (Please.)

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Valve says removing controversial games from Steam is hard so it’s not going to

Posted by | Gaming, Steam, TC, Valve | No Comments

Internet platforms removing objectionable content from their sites has been one of the more difficult challenges for tech companies in recent years. Valve has also determined that it’s a pretty difficult challenge in their Steam gaming store, but unlike some of the other major platforms on the web, they’ve decided they’re not going to do anything unless the content is actually illegal or, as they put it, “straight up trolling.”

The company has also asserted that “the games we allow onto the Store will not be a reflection of Valve’s values…”

Here’s exactly what else Valve employee Erik Johnson said in a company blog post, which you should read in full here:

Valve shouldn’t be the ones deciding this. If you’re a player, we shouldn’t be choosing for you what content you can or can’t buy. If you’re a developer, we shouldn’t be choosing what content you’re allowed to create. Those choices should be yours to make. Our role should be to provide systems and tools to support your efforts to make these choices for yourself, and to help you do it in a way that makes you feel comfortable.

This post is largely in response to the company’s actions regarding a school shooting simulator (pictured above) that caused the ire of many. Valve removed the title from the store, but said it did so because the creator was previously banned and was a “troll.”

There are certainly plenty of those in the gaming community who would hold tightly to the idea that people will buy what they want to and Valve shouldn’t decide which content makes it onto their PC. Honestly, that could be a pretty ideologically defensible position if you didn’t think about the money changing hands here. The problem is Valve takes a pretty big cut of the revenue from titles sold through the store, so when it says that it doesn’t agree with content, that doesn’t mean that it doesn’t want the money it makes from it.

If Valve wants to find objectionable content and then forego their cut while keeping the games available for download that’s one thing, and they can probably stick by the words in their blog post a bit more as a result.

Finding the line in terms of what is okay and what isn’t in gaming is admittedly painfully difficult. You can kill cops and mow down pedestrians in Grand Theft Auto V, which has brought in billions of dollars in revenue single-handedly, but ultimately I think its maker, Rockstar Games, would at least say that they can stand by their game. If Valve isn’t willing to stand by the games they sell as part of their “values,” do they even have values as a company that… sells games?

YouTube is having what seems to border on an existential crisis right now as they have to decide how to monetize videos on their site that contain “objectionable content.” Valve can hide from this kind of a crisis, but they can’t avoid it. Ad-supported models tend to obscure the money exchanging hands, but when someone buys a game on Steam, money goes directly to Valve as an effect.

Valve can ultimately do what it wants here; they can decide that they want to allow ugly content on their store or not, but they can’t act like Steam is just some giant bucket inside of which games just sit. Valve is a multi-billion-dollar business that inhales revenues from every paid title it sells.

Free expression on the web is an awesome thing, even if it seems to suck sometimes, but stores should be responsible for the items they stock on their shelves.

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Europe opens antitrust geo-blocking probe into Valve, others

Posted by | antitrust, asus, bandai namco, capcom, competition law, consumer electronics, Denon & Marantz, eu, Europe, european commission, Focus Home, Gadgets, Gaming, Koch Media, Philips, Pioneer, Steam, TC, Valve, ZeniMax | No Comments

European Commission European antitrust regulators have opened an investigation into the Steam games distribution platform operator, Valve, and five PC games publishers to determine whether geo-blocking agreements between them amount to a breach of the region’s competition rules. Read More

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Facebook is building its own Steam-style desktop gaming platform with Unity

Posted by | Apps, Facebook, Gaming, Mobile, Social, Steam, TC, unity, Valve | No Comments

Facebook Games Facebook may try to compete with Steam, or at least win back revenue lost when casual gaming shifted to mobile. Today Facebook formally announced it’s working with game engine Unity to build a dedicated, downloadable desktop gaming platform, plus it’s broadening the Facebook.com experience for gamers.
Both will allow publishers to offer their iOS and Android games on desktop in… Read More

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The gaming industry can become the next big target of cybercrime

Posted by | Column, cybercrime, cybersecurity, Gaming, malware, Origin, ransomware, Security, Steam, Steam Stealer, TC, Valve | No Comments

gamethief Video-game-related crime is almost as old as the industry itself. But while illegal copies and pirated versions of games were the previous dominant form of illicit activities, recent developments and trends in online gaming platforms have created new possibilities for cybercriminals to swindle huge amounts of money from an industry that is worth nearly $100 billion. And what’s worrisome… Read More

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You can now watch a ton of Lionsgate movies on Steam if you so choose

Posted by | Entertainment, Gaming, lionsgate, Media, movies, Steam, streaming, TC, Valve | No Comments

lionsgate Lionsgate has just added more than 100 movies, including the Hunger Games films and Kill Bill (both volumes) to, of all things, Steam. That’s Valve’s digital content delivery platform, of course, used by millions of PC gamers. Why did Lionsgate add more than 100 movies to a gaming platform? Hard to say. Read More

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Retro gaming fans rejoice: Atari Vault is on Steam with 100 games

Posted by | Atari, Atari Games, Gaming, retro gaming, Steam, TC | No Comments

Atari Vault Longing for the days of the sticky floored arcades of your youth and long nights spent with the the Atari 2600, but can’t be bothered to dig through your mum’s basement to find all the bits and bobs to throw yourself into a retro-gaming binge? Aren’t you in some industrial-strength luck. Available starting today on Steam, Atari Vault gives you 100 retro games to while away… Read More

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Google launches new services for Android game developers

Posted by | api, Developer, Google, Internet advertising, Mobile, Steam, TC, world wide web, YouTube | No Comments

google_play_developers Google today announced a number of new services for game developers at its annual Developer Day at the Game Developers Conference. They include tools for managing virtual goods and currencies, the launch of the Video Recording API so developers can make it easier for players to stream and share videos to YouTube, and a new ad type that allows new players to trial a game for 10 minutes right… Read More

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Play your Steam first-person shooters in full virtual reality with MyDream Swift

Posted by | Gaming, head-mounted displays, Headset, HTC, HTC Vive, Oculus, Oculus Rift, Steam, TC, Virtual reality, virtual reality headset, Vive | No Comments

Screen Shot 2016-03-13 at 3.31.32 PM As the launch dates of the Oculus Rift and the HTC Vive virtual reality headsets approach, so does the release of a ton of awesome VR gaming content. To gamers with full Steam libraries however, it’s kind of a shame that once they put the headset on, most of their favorite content is no longer available to enjoy. MyDream Swift is looking to bring old Steam content into the next… Read More

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