printing

Researchers discover a new way to identify 3D printed guns

Posted by | 3d printing, Buffalo, design, Emerging-Technologies, Fingerprint, Gadgets, industrial design, Makerbot, printer, printing, TC, technology | No Comments

Researchers at the University at Buffalo have found that 3D printers have fingerprints, essentially slight differences in design that can be used to identify prints. This means investigators can examine the layers of a 3D printed object and pinpoint exactly which machine produced the parts.

“3D printing has many wonderful uses, but it’s also a counterfeiter’s dream. Even more concerning, it has the potential to make firearms more readily available to people who are not allowed to possess them,” said Wenyao Xu, lead author of the study.

The researchers found that tiny wrinkles in each layer of plastic can be used to identify a “printer’s model type, filament, nozzle size and other factors cause slight imperfections in the patterns.” They call their technology PrinTracker.

“Like a fingerprint to a person, these patterns are unique and repeatable. As a result, they can be traced back to the 3D printer,” wrote the researchers.

This process works primarily with FDM printers like the Makerbot which use long spools of filament to deposit layers of plastic onto a build plate. Because the printers used in 3D printed guns are usually more complex and more expensive there could be less variation in the individual layers and, more importantly, the layers might be harder to discern. However, for some simpler plastic parts could exhibit variations.

“3D printers are built to be the same. But there are slight variations in their hardware created during the manufacturing process that lead to unique, inevitable and unchangeable patterns in every object they print,” said Xu.

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The Palette 2 lets any 3D printer output color

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The Mosaic Manufacturing Palette 2 – an upgrade the original Palette – is a self-contained system for full color 3D printing. It works by cutting and splicing multiple filament colors and then feeding them through as the object is printed. The system uses a unique and internal cutter called the Splice Core that measures and cuts filament as it prints, ensuring the incoming filament can change colors quickly and easily.

The printer can out items in four colors and it can print any amount of any color. It extrudes excess color into a little object called a tower, allowing it to print as much or as little of a color as necessary. It also has automatic runout detection which lets you print larger objects over a longer period.

It works with a number of current 3D printers and the printers require no real updates to use the Palette or its more robust brother, the Pro. A new piece of software called Canvas allows users to plan their color prints and send the instructions to both the Palette and the printer for printing.

The Palette 2 costs $449 while the Pro costs $699. The Pro lets you print faster than the Palette 2.

It’s a very clever hack – instead of making the printer do all the work you instead make the filament do the work. Because it is a self-contained system you can use the Palette with nearly any printer although the team is working on native support for many popular printers. They are able to print lots of interesting stuff including 3D printed phone case models, rubbery watch bands using stretchable materials, and even educational objects. Most impressive? They were able to print a scan of a brain with evidence of a tumor visible in yellow. While it’s not completely full color – yet – the Palette is a great solution for those looking to print color on a budget.

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XYZPrinting announces the da Vinci Color Mini

Posted by | 3d printing, ceo, equipment, Gadgets, indiegogo, industrial design, office equipment, printer, printing, TC, xyzprinting | No Comments

XYZPrinting may have finally cracked the color 3D printing code. Their latest machine, the $1,599 da Vinci Color Mini is a full color printer that uses three CMY ink cartridges to stain the filament as it is extruded, allowing for up to 15 million color combinations.

The printer is currently available for pre-order on Indiegogo for $999.

The printer can build objects 5.1″ x 5.1″ x 5.1″ in size and it can print PLA or PETG. A small ink cartridge stains the 3D Color-inkjet PLA as it comes out, creating truly colorful objects.

“Desktop full-color 3D printing is here. Now, consumers can purchase an easy-to-operate, affordable, compact full-color 3D printer for $30,000 less than market rate. This is revolutionary because we are giving the public access to technology that was once only available to industry professionals,” said Simon Shen, CEO of XYZprinting.

The new system is aimed at educational and home markets and, at less than a $1,000, it hits a unique and important sweet spot in terms of price. While the prints aren’t perfect, being able to print in full color for the price of a nicer single color 3D printer is pretty impressive.

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XYZPrinting announces a $3,000 full-color 3D printer

Posted by | 3d printing, Gadgets, graphic design, ifa 2017, office equipment, printer, printing, TC | No Comments

 Full-color 3D printing at home has long been a wild-eyed dream of consumers and hobbyists alike. Thus far it’s been fun to print out little trinkets in a single color, but to create something more akin to a painted action figure would be a game-changer. And, thanks to inkjet technology, we just might have reached that milestone. XYZprinting, the maker of the popular Da Vinci line of… Read More

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Markforged announces two 3D printers that produce items as strong as steel

Posted by | 3d printing, Gadgets, industrial design, manufacturing, markforged, printer, printing, TC, technology, typography | No Comments

 Markforged, a 3D printer manufacturer based in Boston, has just announced two new models — the X3 and the X5. Both of these printers are designed to create carbon fiber-infused objects using a standard filament printing system and both can produce items that can replace or are stronger than steel objects. Both printers have auto-leveling and scanning systems to ensure each printed object… Read More

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The Printrbelt lets you print multiple objects on, well, a belt

Posted by | 3d printing, Gadgets, office equipment, printer, printing, Printrbelt, TC, technology, typography | No Comments

A month ago I brought you the Blackbelt, a belt-driven 3D printer with an “infinite Z” meaning you can print really long objects or multiple objects in the same print job. Now there’s a new printer on the block, and it looks like it’s blowing the Blackbelt out of the proverbial 3D printing water. Read More

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The Markforged Mark X lets you teleport precision custom parts from designer to printer

Posted by | 3d printing, business, Gadgets, industrial design, manufacturing, markforged, office equipment, printer, printing, Startups, TC, technology | No Comments

screen-shot-2016-10-11-at-3-43-52-pm The promise of 3D printing has been kind of a dud. Aside from a few cool Yoda heads and some small plastic pieces, there have been no “indie” players doing much interesting in the space except Markforged. Markforged is a Boston company we featured last year that makes carbon-fiber reinforced plastic parts using traditional 3D-printing techniques. This means the objects they print… Read More

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Makerbot doubles-down on its sure bets, professionals and teachers

Posted by | 3d printers, 3d printing, Emerging-Technologies, Gadgets, Makerbot, printer, printing, TC | No Comments

Makerbot 2015 Featured Image The promise of premium home 3D printing hasn’t panned out. Hobbyist printers are common and cheap these days – there are plenty of models at around $500, the price of a really good laser printer – but the original vision of a 3D printer on every desk didn’t quite pan out. And Makerbot learned that piece of news the hard way. When the company started it was the brand… Read More

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